December 2013 update: I'm no longer working as a photographer

In 2009, I launched a company that makes business software for photographers, and now that company is so successful that I've regretfully had to put my photography business on hold indefinitely. You can find out more about this change on my blog.

If you're looking for a photographer, I'm still in touch with many amazing photographers and would be delighted to recommend them to you if you contact me.

Photoblog
September 2009 Archive

2009 Cambridge Film Festival: day seven, Michael Palin

Posted in Commercial and PR at 10:30 on 24/09/2009

The seventh day of the 2009 Cambridge Film Festival featured the biggest event of the festival, Michael Palin's appearance at Ely Cathedral. But first, let's see what was going on back at the Cambridge Arts Picturehouse.

Director Susannah Boehm presented documentary Porgy and Me:

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Olivier Ducastel and Jacques Martineau presented their film, Born in '68:

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The festival team spy theme is straying further and further into film noir territory. Here are the lovely Clare and Thom:

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Then it was off to Ely for the main event of the day, Michael Palin: A Life In Pictures. The event was a collaboration between the Cambridge Film Festival and BAFTA, with Mark Kermode interviewing Michael Palin in front of an audience of 900 people at the spectacular Ely Cathedral.

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The Cambridge Film Festival's drinks reception in one of the cathedral's many chapels:

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Cambridge Film Festival director Tony Jones with presenter Mark Kermode:

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2009 Cambridge Film Festival: day six

Posted in Commercial and PR at 09:32 on 23/09/2009

Day six. Half way through the 2009 Cambridge Film Festival and the hectic schedule of special events, premiers and preview screenings.

Andrei Gruzsniczki, director of The Other Irene:

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The Jungle Radio director Susanne Jäger takes questions from the audience:

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Director Duncan Ward presented Boogie Woogie:

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Cambridge Film Festival partner Sawston cinema:

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Director, photographer and PJ Harvey-collaborator Maria Mochnacz presented her documentary about Howe Gelb, who flew into the film festival from the USA yesterday. Somehow I managed to avoid embarrassing myself and ask loads of questions about working with PJ Harvey - I must be tired!

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Continuing the spy theme for festival and Arts Picturehouse staff, with a couple of villains thrown in for good measure. Cambridge Film Trust development director Adam Bryan is our most charming secret agent so far:

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Talented illustrator Mel Castrillón:

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Festival Daily sub-editor Christopher Peck:

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Filmmaker and evil genius Simon Panrucker:

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2009 Cambridge Film Festival: day five

Posted in Commercial and PR at 09:50 on 22/09/2009

We're coming up to the halfway mark of this year's Cambridge Film Festival, with some of the biggest events still to come.

Hardly Bear To Look At You's director Huck Melnick and actors Jeremy Herman and Anna Neil:

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Ville Jankeri, director of short film The Last Wash, part of the Berlin Without Boundaries season:

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Animation Mary and Max was presented by producer Melanie Coombs:

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Pianist Neil Brand in action again during the screening of Buster Keaton's Our Hospitality at Emmanuel College:

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And finally, continuing this year's spy theme, here's festival intern Alex Phillips channelling Orson Welles:

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2009 Cambridge Film Festival: day four

Posted in Commercial and PR at 09:47 on 21/09/2009

I'm in danger of sounding like a stuck record, but the fourth day of the 2009 Cambridge Film Festival was full of interesting events and screenings.

The First Day of the Rest of Your Life was presented by director Remi Bezancon, but before the screening could start there was the important business of punting down the Cam to attend to. Once I'd shown him how to get started, Remi was a natural:

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The New Humanist magazine sponsored a panel discussion called Science on Screen. Magazine editor Caspar Melville chaired a passionate debate between Leonor Sierra (from Sense About Science), historian Louise Foxcroft and filmmaker Brent Leung (responsible for the controversial film House of Numbers):

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See Caspar Melville's blog post for more on the issues raised by the film and the fact that it was shown at this year's Cambridge Film Festival.

After the success of bringing her first feature, Gypo, to the 2005 Cambridge Film Festival, director Jan Dunn brought The Calling to this year's festival for a preview screening. Actress Susannah York was also in attendance:

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Finally, Magdalene Street was closed off for the Silents in the Streets event, with a series of silent films being screened on a set of screens running the length of the street.

The first screen to start showing films attracted a big crowd on Quayside:

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The second screen, outside St John's College, accompanied by pianist Paul Robinson:

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After a few technical hitches were sorted out, the main screen at the top of Magdalene Street started its programme with a Harold Lloyd silent comedy accompanied by festival regular Neil Brand:

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2009 Cambridge Film Festival: day three

Posted in Commercial and PR at 09:41 on 20/09/2009

Despite being involved in the Cambridge Film Festival since 2005, yesterday was the first time I've been available for the opening Saturday of the festival. WIth several big events, it didn't disappoint…

Rollo Maughfling, the Archbishop of Stonehenge, appeared in documentary The Nature of Existence and took the audience's questions about Druidry after the screening:

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ShortFusion programmer Clare Leczycki with some of the filmmakers who appeared in the Best of British programme:

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Director Susanne Jäger arrived to present The Jungle Radio:

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Festival intern Clare Rastogi continues the festival's spy theme:

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Festival Daily sub-editor Laura Smith is a living example of the healthy lifestyle of Cambridge Film Festival staff (honest):

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Olivier Bohler takes questions about Codename Melville, his documentary about director Jean-Pierre Melville:

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Director Sebastian Lelio appeared via Skype to discuss his film, Navidad:

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The big draw of the day was undoubtedly the preview screening of Charles Darwin biopic Creation. Director Jon Amiel and screenwriter Randal Keynes (who also happens to be Darwins great-grandson) arrived to present the film:

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Randall's father, Richard Keynes, also made an appearance:

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After the film, a packed-out Q&A session in screen 1 of the Cambridge Arts Picturehouse:

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The 2009 Cambridge Film Festival continues until 27 September. Today promises to be one of the highlights, with a repeat of last year's open air screenings on Magdalene Street: silent films projected outside with live piano accompaniment. If you see me there (clue: I'll be the one covered in cameras trying to take pictures in the dark) then come and say hello!

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